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The effect of type of martial art and intensity of training on levels of aggression

O'Leary, Jake (2019) The effect of type of martial art and intensity of training on levels of aggression. Undergraduate thesis, Dublin, National College of Ireland.

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Abstract

The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship that aggression has between intensity of training in martial art and the type of martial art an individual engages in. It was expected that an association existed between hours trained in martial arts and levels of aggression. It was also hypothesised that an association exist between the type of martial art an individual engaged in on the aggression levels. The rationale behind this explains that many studies have reported that the longer an individual engages in martial arts, the less aggressive they become, with the type of martial art playing a key role in this decreased aggression. The Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire was used and individuals answered twenty-nine statements such as ‘’My friends think I’m hotheaded’’. Answers ranged from ‘’completely uncharacteristic’’ to ‘’completely characteristic’’. Individuals who engaged in four types of martial arts took part: jiu jitsu, karate, MMA, and boxing. Analysis suggested no significant difference between hours trained per week and aggression levels. The same was discovered for type of martial art an individual engaged in and levels of aggression. Findings suggest other variables such as gender be controlled for more prominently in order to help findings be more reliable overall. The study suggests clinical applications of martial arts engagement in light of the current findings.

Item Type: Thesis (Undergraduate)
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology
Divisions: School of Business > BA (Honours) in Psychology
Depositing User: CAOIMHE NI MHAICIN
Date Deposited: 29 May 2019 14:15
Last Modified: 29 May 2019 14:15
URI: http://trap.ncirl.ie/id/eprint/3766

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