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Learning through Storytelling in a Children’s Hospice - A Study of the Perspectives of the Storyteller and the Listener in Schwartz Rounds

Vaughan, Amanda M. (2018) Learning through Storytelling in a Children’s Hospice - A Study of the Perspectives of the Storyteller and the Listener in Schwartz Rounds. Masters thesis, Dublin, National College of Ireland.

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Abstract

Background:
The aim of this study was to examine the impact of Schwartz Rounds, a storytelling forum for providing staff emotional support, on the storyteller, the listener and the wider staff population within a children’s hospice.

Methods:
A series of semi-structured interviews were conducted with staff exploring the impact of Schwartz Rounds on both the storyteller (panellist) and the listener (participants) in the Round. The key themes were extracted using Grounded Theory.

Results:
Analysis of the results revealed that the Rounds were an important addition to the range of staff supports in the hospice. The stories fulfilled several roles – to allow both teller and listener to interpret past and anticipated experience; to pass on knowledge; to entertain; to reflect; to learn and to bring about individual change. The storyteller perspective of the Rounds moves through three distinct phases-; the Pre-Round, during the Round and Post-Round, each with a respective set of characteristics. The listener’s perspective centres on learning to speak at a different level in the workplace; all stories are not equal; seeing the person behind the role and personal growth and development. Both storyteller and listener share a perspective where storytelling is seen as a performance; the Rounds are fostering connection and community, building resilience and trust and changing organisational culture.

Conclusion:
Learning through storytelling using Schwartz Rounds at LauraLynn, Ireland’s Children’s Hospice appears to be effecting a change in behaviour on the part of the storyteller and the listener and consequently producing a positive impact on staff wellbeing and organisational culture. This safe, tightly structured space that staff enter for one hour and share stories, creates a resonance that permeates across culture and collegiality in the organisation. This results in increased empathy, tolerance and connection between staff members.

Item Type: Thesis (Masters)
Subjects: R Medicine > Healthcare Industry
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology > Organisational Behaviour
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology > Organisational Behaviour > Organisational Culture
Divisions: School of Business > Master of Arts in Learning and Teaching
Depositing User: CAOIMHE NI MHAICIN
Date Deposited: 03 Nov 2018 11:17
Last Modified: 03 Nov 2018 11:17
URI: http://trap.ncirl.ie/id/eprint/3410

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