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Perceptions and Use of Technology to Support Self-management for Older Adults Living with Multiple Health Conditions within a Care Ecosystem

Murphy, Emma, Doyle, Julie, Hannigan, Caoimhe, Smith, Suzanne and Dinsmore, John (2017) Perceptions and Use of Technology to Support Self-management for Older Adults Living with Multiple Health Conditions within a Care Ecosystem. Age and Ageing, 46 (3). iii13-iii59. ISSN 1468-2834

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Abstract

Background
There are few empirical investigations exploring older people’s experience and perceptions of health technologies. While older adults generally have positive opinions and attitudes towards trying and using new technologies (Mitzner et al., 2010), health status itself is a moderating factor for computer use and digital literacy (Heart and Kalderon, 2013).
In this study we have explored what technologies older people with multimorbidity (PwMs) are currently using and how they, and their networks of care, perceive technology to support their health conditions. The results presented here are part of an extensive requirements gathering exercise to inform the design of a digital health ecosystem that aims to support self-management and improve integration of care for older PwMs.

Methods
Semi-structured qualitative interviews and focus groups were conducted with 19 older PwMs, 7 informal carers, 16 formal care workers, 6 general practitioners, 4 pharmacists, and 15 other healthcare professionals. Interviews and focus groups were transcribed and analysed using thematic analysis.

Results
Older adults with multimorbidity perceive technology as a mechanism to sustain living independently in their own home but have concerns around accessibility and ease of use. Healthcare professionals were more cautionary in their perception of the role of new technology to support PwMs, primarily due to privacy and security concerns. Both PwMs and GPs highlighted the potential for digital monitoring to create additional anxiety about health conditions.

Conclusion
This empirical investigation has highlighted barriers and drivers for the design of new technology to support people living with multimorbidity.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology
B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > Psychology > Cognitive psychology
R Medicine > Healthcare Industry
Divisions: School of Business > Staff Research and Publications
Related URLs:
Depositing User: CAOIMHE NI MHAICIN
Date Deposited: 24 Sep 2018 10:57
Last Modified: 24 Sep 2018 10:57
URI: http://trap.ncirl.ie/id/eprint/3187

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