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Gender, the Internet and New Technologies: Theoretical and Analytical Investigations into Genderisation Processes and their Application to the Introduction of New Technologies and Social Structures. (Volume 1)

Connolly, Imelda (1998) Gender, the Internet and New Technologies: Theoretical and Analytical Investigations into Genderisation Processes and their Application to the Introduction of New Technologies and Social Structures. (Volume 1). Doctoral thesis, Dublin, National College of Ireland.

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Abstract

A comprehensive review of literature concerning the biological determination of sex and genderised behaviours, theoretical accounts of the development of gender role identity and the debatable extent of gender differences in a wide range of physical, intellectual, emotional, moral, linguistic and occupational areas is presented A brief history of the development of the computer and Internet is outlines. Demographic data on Internet users are discussed and historical, educational, media, employment and financial factors which may contribute to the current female underrepresentation on the Internet are examined.
A theoretical framework is presented which accounts for the gernderisation of activities, occupations and technologies. This mechanism is then applied to new technologies and the Internet in particular.
The results of six experimental and investigative studies are presented. Study (A) examined the ability of 126 subjects to identify the gender of the authors of on-screen texts. The results indicate that the subject identification scores are compatible with the scores expected from random guessing. Study (B) examined age and gender differences in perceived risk-taking strategies adopted by 354 subjects when participating in a computerised card game. The results showed that males took greater risks than females and older subjects took more optimal risks than younger subjects. Study (C) involved a re-examination of Jean Piaget's 1932 data on reciprocity in revenge. The results confirmed that male subjects took more perceived risks than female subjects. Study (D) involved a selective analysis of statistical data reported in eight GVU www user surveys. Study (F) examined the gender bias found in sampled of internet and male and female oriented magazines. A male gender bias was found in the Internet magazines.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Subjects: Z Bibliography. Library Science. Information Resources > ZA Information resources > ZA4150 Computer Network Resources > The Internet
T Technology > TK Electrical engineering. Electronics. Nuclear engineering > Telecommunications > The Internet

H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman > Gender
H Social Sciences > HM Sociology
Divisions: School of Computing > PHD
Depositing User: Tim Lawless
Date Deposited: 03 Jun 2010 15:14
Last Modified: 26 Apr 2012 14:55
URI: http://trap.ncirl.ie/id/eprint/244

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