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The antecedents, attributes and consequences of trust among nurses and nurse managers: A concept analysis.

McCabe, Thomas, J. and Sambrook, Sally (2014) The antecedents, attributes and consequences of trust among nurses and nurse managers: A concept analysis. International Journal of Nursing Studies, 51 (5). pp. 815-827. ISSN 0020-7489

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Abstract

Background
Although trust has been investigated in the health context, limited research explores nurse and nurse manager perceptions of trust.

Objective
To explore the concept of trust amongst nurses and nurse managers at individual, interpersonal and organisational levels.

Design
Our paper reports the findings from an interpretivist study conducted within the British National Health Service, involving thirty-nine semi-structured interviews with nurses and nurse managers.

Settings
Large acute and small community organisation within the British National Health Service.

Participants
28 nurses and 11 nurse managers working within an Acute and a Community sector organisation – 20 and 19 in each organisation. Participants were selected through a process of purposive sampling, reflecting variations in terms of age, grade, ward and tenure.

Methods
We utilise a concept analysis framework in exploring the antecedents, attributes and consequences of trust amongst nurses and nurse managers at individual, interpersonal and organisational levels.

Results
Key findings suggest that trust is formed within the immediate ward environment, and is significantly influenced by the role of line manager. Other positively influencing factors include professionalism and commitment to the nursing profession. These form the basis for the teamwork, delegation, support, open communication systems, confidentiality and discretion essential to delivering quality patient care. Negatively influencing factors include new management concepts, practices and styles overseen by managers recruited from the private sector. New management concepts were associated with reductions in the number of qualified nurses and increasing numbers of untrained nursing staff, reduced direct patient contact, less opportunities for professional training and development and deteriorating terms and conditions of employment.

Conclusions
Our findings offer insight for managers, nurses and human resource practitioners to help build high trust relationships in a health care context. Of particular import is the need for managers to communicate more effectively organisational and financial constraints, in a manner that does not ‘alienate’ nurses and nurse managers, by highlighting their value and acknowledging their role in delivering high quality patient care.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Electronic publication in advance of print version.
Subjects: R Medicine > RT Nursing
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management > Human Resource Management
Divisions: School of Business > Staff Research and Publications
Related URLs:
Depositing User: Tim Lawless
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2014 12:26
Last Modified: 24 Jun 2014 12:52
URI: http://trap.ncirl.ie/id/eprint/1002

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